Revolution CT : Make advanced exams routine and routine exams advanced.

The West Kendall Baptist Hospital, in Miami, Florida, celebrated the first US installation of the new Revolution Computed Tomography (CT) scanner last month. GE Chairman and CEO, Jeff Immelt, visited the hospital for a tour and reception with local business leaders and Baptist health executives. CT has been around for a while, but the technical … Continue reading

Robotic surgery problem that will keep Human Doctor & Surgeon on payroll.

  There’s one big problem with robotic surgery that will keep your human doctor on the payroll: It’s not better, and much more expensive. Since the first robotic surgery was performed in 1985, the popularity of robotic surgery has exploded, yet a study published Dec. 18 in JAMA Surgery suggests that there’s still a long … Continue reading

Earlier Diagnosis – the Key to Improved Management of Neurological Disorders?

  Join GE Healthcare and pharmaphorum for a tweetchat on neurological disorders and the importance of an earlier diagnosis. A recent survey shows how delayed diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Multiple Sclerosis impacted patients and carers and we will discuss the issues this raises, including: Understanding the impact earlier diagnosis makes on downstream management of … Continue reading

Deep Vascular Imaging in Wounds

When we’re wounded, our bodies rush to repair the damage. First, there’s a blood clot that forms quickly and acts as a temporary seal. Then follows the more gradual process of angiogenesis – the growth of new blood vessels to replace those that are injured. This image is of a wound healing on a mouse. It was captured … Continue reading

Happy Doctor’s Day

    Doctor, as a title, originates from the Latin word of the same spelling and meaning. The word is originally an agentive noun of the Latin verb docēre [dɔˈkeːrɛ] ‘to teach’. It has been used as an honored academic title for over a millennium in Europe, where it dates back to the rise of … Continue reading

WEBINAR – Factors Affecting Hemoglobin A1c Values (US)

Educational webinar “Factors Affecting Hemoglobin A1c Values” with Trefor N. Higgins – Director, Clinical Chemistry at DynaLIFEDx and Clinical Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Alberta. Speaker: Trefor N. Higgins Director, Clinical Chemistry – DynaLIFEDx Clinical Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology – University of Alberta According to the … Continue reading

WEBINAR – High-end hybrid operation rooms @June 19, 2013, 3:00 pm CET

About this Clinical Webinar In 2012, the University of Ulm in Germany established a high-end hybrid operating room in their Center for Surgery. Trauma, neuro, vascular as well as cardiac surgeons share the new operating room which combines the most-recent robotic 3D imaging system Artis zeego by Siemens with a modern OR table by Trumpf. … Continue reading

WEBINAR – Oral Health Care for Pregnant Women @ Monday, June 3, 2013 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM CDT

Elk Grove Village, Ill.—The American Academy of Pediatrics is hosting a free webinar to discuss the importance of collaboration among health professionals to ensure that the oral health needs of pregnant women are met. The Working Together to Promote Oral Health Care for Pregnant Women Webinar will be held June 3, noon–1:30 p.m. Central time. … Continue reading

Steroid cover for dental patients on long-term steroid medication: proposed clinical guidelines based upon a critical review of the literature

  Glucocorticoids were first introduced in the 1940s and have become a widely pre-scribed class of drugs. Subsequently, con-cern developed regarding the potential of exogenous steroids to suppress normaladrenal gland function. This resulted in development of recommendations for additional glucocorticoid supplementation, or ‘steroid cover’, for management of patients undergoing stressful situations such as surgery or … Continue reading

Hospital ‘superbug’ – ”carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae” (CPE)

  Sleep Walking in Super bug Crisis   Doctors are unsure how many patients have been killed by carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae. Hospitals in England are not required to officially report infections of a “superbug” capable of resisting our most powerful antibiotics, a BBC investigation has found. Cases of “carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae” (CPE) have shown a sharp rise. … Continue reading

Hand in Diagnosis

Clubbing In medicine, nail clubbing (also known as drumstick fingers and watch-glass nails) is a deformity of the fingers and fingernails associated with a number of diseases, mostly of the heart and lungs. Hippocrates was probably the first to document clubbing as a sign of disease, and the phenomenon is therefore occasionally called Hippocratic fingers. … Continue reading

Brain : Alzheimer’s Association

Your brain is your most powerful organ, yet weighs only about three pounds. It has a texture similar to firm jelly. It has three main parts: The cerebrum fills up most of your skull. It is involved in remembering, problem solving, thinking, and feeling. It also controls movement. The cerebellum sits at the back of … Continue reading

What’s In A Flu Name? Hs And Ns Tell A Tale

In biology, you can’t get much simpler than viruses. They stick onto cells, pop open and then dump their genes inside to reproduce. But the naming of viruses isn’t so easy to follow. There’s the new H7N9 spreading through China. And H5N1 is popping up in Southeast Asia. Last summer, H3N2 sickened dozens of people … Continue reading

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), also known as corticotropin

  A polypeptide tropic hormone produced and secreted by the anterior pituitary gland.   It is an important component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and is often produced in response to biological stress (along with its precursor corticotropin-releasing hormone from the hypothalamus) .  Its principal effects are increased production and release of corticosteroids.   Associated conditions   Diseases … Continue reading

Gate Control Theory of Pain

To explain why thoughts and emotions influence pain perception, Ronald Melzack and Patrick Wall proposed that a gating mechanism exists within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Small nerve fibers (pain receptors) and large nerve fibers (“normal” receptors) synapse on projection cells (P), which go up the spinothalamic tract to the brain, and inhibitory … Continue reading

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